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Miami-Dade school chief Alberto Carvalho moves to head LA school system


OPINION AND COMMENT

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Superintendent Alberto Carvalho takes a punt and smiles after being asked which basketball team he would support now, the Heat or the Lakers.  On Thursday, December 9, 2021, Miami-Dade Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho announced his departure for Los Angeles as the new superintendent during his press conference at iPrep Academy in Miami, Florida.

Superintendent Alberto Carvalho takes a punt and smiles after being asked which basketball team he would support now, the Heat or the Lakers. On Thursday, December 9, 2021, Miami-Dade Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho announced his departure for Los Angeles as the new superintendent during his press conference at iPrep Academy in Miami, Florida.

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The superintendent of the nation’s high-value public schools, Miami-Dade Schools, is heading to Hollywood.

Alberto Carvalho leaves the district to become the leader of the Los Angeles Unified School District. Is it a shock? No. Caravlho has always been an attractive asset to other school districts. But is it a surprise? Yes, and it will be difficult to replace.

“He informed me this morning that he was going to leave,” school board president Perla Tabares Hantman told the editorial board, who herself added that she was “surprised” even though Carvalho had mentioned two weeks ago that he had received job offers.

“As the person who came up with the nomination of Alberto Carvalho as the manager of Miami-Dade, I can honestly say that it was one of the best decisions I have made in my professional life,” Tabares Hantman said later. in a prepared statement. . “Over the past 14 years, with his team and under the direction of school board policy, he has transformed our school district into one of the best in the world.

There is no doubt that the departure of Carvalho is bad news for the Miami-Dade schools and a headache for the district, which must now first find an interim, then launch a national search for the replacement of Carvalho. And it will be a real challenge.

Carvalho, who has led the district since 2008, is one of the country’s few rock-star superintendents. His departure is undoubtedly an upheaval for the neighborhood. Carvalho is a leader who cares about educating and protecting our children, as he did during the COVID crisis and his battles with the powers that be in Tallahassee.

It’s no surprise that LA, the second largest district, is coming knocking on the door. Carvalho raised the academic achievement and national stature of our district, as well as his own. And rightly so. Carvalho is so invested in the success of this neighborhood that he could do any job there. Not bad for a former science teacher.

“I can truly say that the children of LA, their school board, employees and the community will have a dedicated and innovative educator of the highest caliber,” said Tabares Hantman.

But, lately, Carvalho’s influence over the Miami-Dade School Board, as new members were elected, a state government openly making public education a political tool and parents upset with the former. Online education failures linked to COVID had changed the dynamic in the district headquarters.

It’s unclear whether Carvalho’s contract would have been renewed next year, and California is much more education-friendly and with less intrusive partisan politics. It does not matter that school boards are the new battleground for the politics of division in this country.

Much of the task of finding a temp and starting the search now rests with Tabares Hantman and the board. “I have been in this role before and hope to lead the board again through these difficult times. “

It’s not the first time Carvalho has tried to leave. Three years ago, Mayor Bill de Blasio gave him New York. Carvalho decided to stay put this time.

But that’s not the case this time around.

Upon his departure, Carvalho is to be commended for his heroic position in ensuring the health and safety – indeed, the very lives – of students, faculty, administrators and staff as they returned to the in-person learning from Governor Ron. DeSantis’ threat to fund the nation’s fourth largest district if it violates its ban on mask warrants.

As we said – high value. Our students – and our entire community – are better off for his years of dedicated service to the District.

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This story was originally published December 9, 2021 at 12:19 pm.


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